Village Tattler Review: Jekyll & Hyde Triumphs at Engeman Theater

The Village Tattler

Claudia D. Wheeler

March 30, 2017

 

The John W. Engeman Theater has not ceased to amaze audiences with its fantastic 2016-2017 season. Jekyll & Hyde is no exception. The amazing nineteenth-century period costumes, off-the-charts talent, and chemistry between the actors is worthy of a second visit to this show, which runs through Sunday, April 30, 2017. The musical will play the following performance schedule: Thursdays at 8:00pm, Fridays at 8:00pm, Saturdays at 3:00pm and 8:00pm, and Sundays at 2:00. Some Wednesday and Sunday evenings are available. Tickets are $76 on Saturday evenings, $71 all other performances and may be purchased by calling (631) 261-2900, going online at www.EngemanTheater.com, or by visiting the Engeman Theater Box Office at 250 Main Street, Northport.

Set in nineteenth-century London and based on the classic novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, the musical Jekyll & Hyde features a score of pop rock hits from multi-Grammy and Tony-nominated Frank Wildhorn and double Oscar and Grammy winning Leslie Bricusse. It’s a tale many of us know well of two men, a doctor and a madman, and the two women who love them. This production is produced by Richard T. Dolce, the Engeman’s Producing Artistic Director, and directed and choreographed by Paul Stancato (Engeman Theater: Sound of Music, Hairspray; Broadway: The Wedding Singer (Asst. Choreo.), The Lion King (Res. Director); National Tours: Flashdance (Dir/Choreo), Jekyll & Hyde (Dir/Choreo), The Wedding Singer (Dir); International: House of Dancing Water (Artistic Director), New York; Regional: NYMF, Beckett Theater, Minetta Lane, Flatrock Playhouse, Palm Beach Dramaworks and the Zipper Theater). Musical direction is by Kristen Lee Rosenfeld (National Tour: Spring Awakening; NYC: Band of Angels, Divided – Composer). TheAssociate Director is Dana Iannuzzi (National/International Tour: Flashdance; NYC: ICON, The Cobalteans, Divided).

Acting and vocal recognition must go first to Nathaniel Hackmann, who plays both Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with such astounding passion, giving the role more than 100 percent. The transformation scene from Jekyll to Hyde is mesmerizing and a particularly hard scene to pull off for any actor. Hackmann just soars in this production as the story unfolds, lending a believable and emotional depth to the character, as he portrays a man coming apart at the seams due to his own experimentation and his wish to play God. His vocals are of particular note, as Dr. Jekyll in “This is the Moment,” and with his romantic interest Emma in “Take Me As I Am,” but also as Hyde in “Alive” and with the character Lucy in “Dangerous Game.” It would be worth going to the production a second time just to listen to Hackmann’s impressive vocals.

Hackmann makes his Engeman debut in this production. Credits include Broadway/National Tours: Les Miserables (Valjean, Javert u/s), Paint Your Wagon (Steve); Regional: Beauty and the Beast at MUNY (Gaston), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Oliver!, Sweeney ToddA Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the ForumCarousel, Ragtime, Into the Woods, Camelot, Sanders Family Christmas, Bye Bye Birdie).

Also of note are both leading ladies making Engeman debuts, who play characters Emma Carew and Lucy Harris–Liana Hunt and Caitlyn Caughell, respectively. They each are cast perfectly in their roles. Hunt gives just the right amount of sweetness and caring to her role as Emma, Dr. Jekyll’s fiancée, whose beautiful soprano voice shines in her duet with him, “Take Me As I Am.” Hunt’s credits include Broadway: Newsies (Katherine), Mamma Mia! (Sophie); National Tours: Wicked (Nessarose), Mamma Mia! (Sophie); Regional: Private Lives at Riverside Theatre, Les Miserables at Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, Beauty and the Beast at Jean’s Playhouse.

Caughell’s performance as the prostitute Lucy is right on the mark,  with powerful vocals, especially notable in “Someone Like You” and “A New Life,” songs that any actress/singer would dream to have the chance to perform. Here the duality of good and evil meets up in Jekyll & Hyde. Jekyll first meets Lucy at The Red Rat, where Lucy is a bar girl. They are drawn to each other and Jekyll gives her his number before he leaves the bar, letting her know that she can rely on his help should she need it. Lucy becomes dangerously involved with Mr. Hyde.

The cast also includes a fantastic ensemble who perform in many well-choreographed numbers, including “Facade,” with Lucy in “Bring on the Men,” and of particular note, “Murder, Murder,” on the streets of London. The ensemble includes Danny Arnold, Ryan Bloomquist, Joey Calveri, Lily Dickinson, Lauren Gobes, Laura Helm, Deven Kolluri, Megan Koumis, Rebecca Kuznick, Tom Lucca, Jake Mills, William Mulligan, Bronson Norris Murphy, Blake Price, James D. Schultz, Teresa Whitt, and Jeff Williams.

Performing as a creative team, the amazing scenic design is by Stephen Dobay with costume design by Kurt Alger, lighting design by Keith A. Truax, sound design by Laura Shubert, and casting directors, Scott Wojcik and Holly Buczek of Wojcik/Seay Casting.

 

Read online: http://villagetattler.com/jekyll-hyde-triumphs-northports-engeman-theater/

Smithtown Matters Review: Jekyll & Hyde

Smithtown Matters

Jeb Ladouceur

March 28, 2017

 

About twenty years ago, when I first heard that the famed thriller novella (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson) was to be staged as a musical, my initial reaction was, ‘What next?’ I feared the moguls of Broadway might eventually give us a musical comedy version of ‘The Bad Seed,’ for heaven’s sake … just to show that nothing is impossible in the wacky world of show business.

Furthermore, I was convinced that ‘Jekyll & Hyde – The Musical’ would soon find itself on the scrap heap of failed productions that depend solely on the popularity of late 19th century literary works for their success.

How wrong I was. Four years later, the melodramatic ‘Jekyll & Hyde’ was still packing in enthusiastic audiences at New York’s Plymouth theater (a record for that grand old playhouse at the time) and the show finally closed after an impressive 1,543 regular performances! It had garnered four Tony nominations … won in the ‘Best Costumes’ category … and was even more triumphant in the prestigious Drama Desk, and Outer Circle Awards groupings.

Sadly, I never saw the Broadway offering.

The story, of course, is a familiar one … it’s a general analysis of how good and evil can co-exist in the same person … and the production on the Engeman boards now thru April 30 has gambits that smack of Sondheim, Wilde, and Shakespeare … specifically: Sweeney Todd, The Picture of Dorian Gray, and Othello.

What the current Engeman show has that those other theatrical creations almost assuredly did not, however, is the most versatile, dynamic, energetic performance that this critic has ever seen! Indeed, any theater aficionados who miss the opportunity to observe Nathaniel Hackman in the demanding dual roles of compassionate Dr. Henry Jekyll and vicious Mr. Edward Hyde, will be depriving themselves of the artistic treat of a lifetime.

Producer Richard Dolce will stage ‘Jekyll & Hyde – The Musical’ at Northport’s delightful Engeman Theater thru April 30th(Thursday, Friday, Saturday evenings – with Matinees on Saturday and Sunday). The guess here is that once word gets around about the virtuosity of Mr. Hackman, a majority of those dates will be sold out … just as the matinee was when I attended last Saturday.

In critiques such as this one, it is required that the reviewer support his claims whether they be superlative or disparaging. That said, the critic’s task of reporting on the ‘Jekyll & Hyde’  now under consideration is immediately reduced by half … there is absolutely nothing censorious to say about this polished gem of a show.

Accordingly, we may focus on Mr. Hackman’s considerable skills that made his performance the magical tour de force it became: It goes without saying that this play requires deep insight into the nature good and evil … particularly as they occupy the body of a single individual simultaneously (this, after all, is the plot in a nutshell). In that regard, Nathaniel Hackman immediately makes gasping believers of his audience despite the improbable nature of the proposition.

Then there is the matter of the remarkable lead actor’s singing voice. The man’s appealing baritone is quite simply top-notch. I never heard him miss a single note or beat in two hours. As for his stage presence … Hackman owned the Engeman boards with every step he took, whether as the romantic Dr. Jekyll or the threatening Mr. Hyde.

It would be unfair to reveal much of the detail about the special effects that Director / Choreographer Paul Stancato and Lighting Designer Keith Truax have in store for audiences during the forthcoming month. Suffice it to say that both impresarios combine to take full advantage of Hackman’s energetic skills, and together the trio creates an absolutely unforgettable climactic light show that theatergoers will be talking about for generations.

If that sounds like hyperbole … go see for yourself. Like everyone else in the grand Engeman Theater (including Nathaniel Hackman’s accomplished fellow actors) you’ll stand and cheer this wonderfully gifted artist off the stage.

 

Read online: http://www.smithtownmatters.com/theater-review-jekyll-hyde.html

Long Islander Review: Good And Evil Battle In Engeman’s ‘Jekyll & Hyde’

The Long Islander

Janee Law

March 27, 2017

 

In John W. Engeman Theater’s production of “Jekyll & Hyde” audiences are exposed to an authentic battle between good and evil.

The battle is particularly apparent in “Confrontation,” a mesmerizing performance in which Dr. Henry Jekyll, a gentle, passionate and romantic giant displays his internal battle with the violent beast and petrifying madman, Mr. Edward Hyde.

Based on the 1886 story, “Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson, the Northport Village production features a thrilling score of pop rock hits from multi Grammy- and Tony Award-nominated composer Frank Wildhorn and two-time Oscar- and Grammy-winning composer Leslie Bricusse.

As Paul Stancato serves as director and choreographer of the production, the ensemble commands the stage with its operetta synchronization.

For Penelope Voeller, an audience member at last Friday’s show, she said the production delivered an operatic quality, adding that “Broadway is in Long Island and very fortunate.”

In “Transformation,” Nathanial Hackmann (Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde) starts the captivating scene as the well-mannered and soft-spoken doctor, but then, in a physical battle, Hackmann effortlessly transforms into the grunting and indecorous brute.

Not only is Hackmann’s ability to embody polar opposite personalities impressive, but he is also a powerful singer. He bellows beautiful operetta tones in “Take Me As I Am,” and exposes his low, mid-range voice with gritty angst and operetta pitches in “Alive!”

The production’s leading ladies are Caitlyn Caughell, as the beautiful and seductive Lucy Harris, and Liana Hunt, as the beautiful and trusting Emma Carew. In “In His Eyes,” the two stun the audience with a compelling duet.

Chris Mancini, another audience member, said her favorite character was Lucy, adding that Caughell’s portrayal of the character was amazing and “her singing was fantastic.”

When both Hackmann and Caughell hit the stage, their chemistry is undeniable. The passionate and toxic pull between the duo in “Dangerous Game” is thrilling and authentic.

For Voeller, her particularly favorite scene was “Dangerous Game.” She added that “There was a great chemistry between both performers and they were very professional. That moment was very believable.”

Although Hackmann loves all the scenes he performs on stage, his favorite last Friday was “Dangerous Game.” Hackmann said he enjoyed hearing the reaction of the audience at the end of the scene.

“It’s the greatest fruition of any long process, when you see that goal and you can feel the work you’re doing is effective,” he said. “That’s exactly what we do it for.”

Hackmann added that this has been the hardest performance he’s done on stage.

“Trying to be specific and trying to be contrasting between the two characters is an amazing challenge, but it’s also a bucket list part,” he said. “It’s something I’ve been in love with since I was a kid so the opportunity to get to do this is just amazing.”

When he learned that he landed the part, Hackmann said, he did a lot of research on dissociative identity and borderline personality disorders to prepare for the role and find authenticity within the character.

“I was very lucky because of our director and the way he let us go through the process,” he said. “We talked very much about specific choices about what the characteristics of the two characters will be. The body language, the accent choices, and the voice choices were very specific from the very beginning.”

 

Read online: http://www.longislandernews.com/good-and-evil-battle-in-engemans-jekyll-hyde

Broadway World Review: JEKYLL & HYDE at the Engeman

Broadway World

Melissa Giordano

March 22, 2017

 

To start, this article will probably not do this incredible production justice. The latest at the John W. Engeman Theatre of Northport, Jekyll & Hyde, The Musical, is absolutely electrifying and the Broadway caliber cast is positively glorious. This is, without a doubt, a must see for Long Island this season. And by the reaction of the sold out audience on opening night, you may want to get your tickets quickly as this runs through April 30th.

Set to a commanding pop-rock score by Frank Wildhorn (music) and book writer Leslie Bricuse (lyrics), the thriller follows Dr. Henry Jekyll attempting to cure his ailing father’s illness by separating “good” from “evil” in the human personality. Dr. Jekyll, however, inadvertently creates an alternate personality of evil – who he names Mr. Hyde – and wreaks horrifying havoc in London.

Paul Stancato wonderfully directs and choreographs the brilliant cast headed up by Nathanial Hackmann. A wondrous talent and spectacular voice make Mr. Hackmann a natural in the role(s). His sharp attention to detail for each character (stance, movement, ext.) is inspired. This particularly during the intense “Confrontation” number where Jekyll is battling Hyde to be free from his murderous grasp.

And, naturally, the leading ladies are dazzling. Liana Hunt portrays Emma, Dr. Jekyll’s fiancé. Emma’s sweet devotion to Dr. Jekyll balances well with her headstrong demeanor. Indeed, her rendition of “Once Upon a Dream” is met with thunderous applause. And Caitlyn Caughell is superb as Lucy, the main attraction at The Red Rat, a sleazy club. Just as Jekyll has a “light” and “dark” side, Lucy is the “dark” to Emma’s “light” as Lucy is deeply attracted to Hyde. Ms. Caughell’s performance of “Bring on the Men” was particularly fun and sassy.

I really could go on and on (and on!) about the entire cast, but I think you get the idea that the entire company is really outstanding.

As for Mr. Stancato’s amazing creative team, a clever set by Stephen Dobay is enhanced ideally (and, at times, chillingly) by Keith Truax’s lighting (Dr. Jekyll’s basement laboratory is a highlight). The mood and tone is set perfectly under the musical direction of Kristen Lee Rosenfeld and her orchestra with Laura Shubert‘s spot-on sound design. Additionally, Kurt Alger’s costumes are breath-taking.

Even as I write this, I am still rendered speechless at this exhilarating production. A top-notch production with an unnerving story make for a thrilling night of theatre.

 

Read online: www.broadwayworld.com/BWW-Review-JEKYLL-HYDE-at-the-Engeman

Newsday Review: Evil has never been so good in ‘Jekyll & Hyde’

Newsday

Steve Parks

March 20, 2017

 

Since the first publication of Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” in 1886, the phrase “Jekyll and Hyde” has become part of the language, denoting a person whose moral character is diametrically opposed from one situation to the next. Since its Broadway debut 20 years ago, “Jekyll & Hyde” the musical has become a cult phenomenon combining classic literature with a melodramatic pop score spawning fan clubs the world over.

The challenge for director-choreographer Paul Stancato at the Engeman Theater in this latest of a half-dozen Long Island “J&H” productions over the years is to present it with a fresh look without detracting from its core appeal.

He and an earnest cast succeed spectacularly, led by Nathaniel Hackmann in the chemically split-personality role of Jekyll/Hyde. Dr. Henry Jekyll, frustrated by a hospital board’s refusal to endorse his laboratory experiment in separating good from evil in a human guinea pig, decides to make himself the guinea pig. The result is Edward Hyde, who proceeds to murder the entire hospital board. Jekyll becomes a stranger to his bride-to-be, played and sung by Liana Hunt with a delicate balance between devotion and determination, and to himself within his own body. Lucy, a London harlot, meets both Jekyll and Hyde, not realizing that they’re “related.” With a voice ranging from sultry to siren, Caitlyn Caughell captures Lucy’s angst in finally meeting a decent man (“Someone Like You”) while being pursued by a monster.

Hackmann electrifies on such signature numbers as “This Is the Moment” and on the climactic “Confrontation” in which his duality is brilliantly conveyed through a translucent scrim behind which Jekyll struggles to escape Hyde’s enveloping hold on his life. (Victorian set design by Stephen Dobay, dramatic lighting by Keith Truax, throbbingly amplified by Kristen Lee Rosenfeld’s band.) One quibble: The shadow effects of the sliding scrims deployed throughout the show are overused to diminishing effect, until the riveting penultimate scene.

A deep cast contributes splendidly to smaller supporting roles — among them Tom Lucca as Jekyll’s loyal friend, Jeff Williams as his prospective father-in-law, Jake Mills as the whoring bishop and Lauren Gobes as the judgmental ladyship (dazzling costumes by Kurt Alger), plus an ensemble too numerous, unfortunately, to credit here. Together they make the chorus numbers sparkle in this fine new production of a modern classic.

 

Read online: www.newsday.com/jekyll-hyde-review-nathaniel-hackmann-leads-a-terrific-cast/

Times of Huntington-Northport Review: ‘Jekyll & Hyde’ mesmerizes at the Engeman

Times of Huntington-Northport

Victoria Espinoza

March 21, 2017

 

For theatergoers with one personality or more, the newest production at the John W. Engeman Theater has something for all. The Northport playhouse kicked off its seven-week run of “Jekyll and Hyde The Musical” this past weekend to a full house, and the multiple Tony-nominated production felt alive as ever on the Engeman stage.

Led by director Paul Stancato, who also serves as choreographer and has been at the helm of several other shows at the Engeman theater, the classic tale of Dr. Henry Jekyll and his doomed science experiment draws you in from the moment you meet the leading man.

The show starts with a stiff rejection, coming from the hospital board that refuses to support Jekyll’s experiments to understand why man is both good and evil and to separate the good from the evil. However, the doctor does not take defeat lying down and eventually decides to make himself the patient in the experiment. As the name of the show suggests, soon we have two leading men fighting for the spotlight, as Jekyll’s potions give birth to Edward Hyde, the purest projection of evil who lives inside Jekyll.

Not only does Hackmann transport you through love, torment, sin and more with his voice, but he also convinces with his body language. He lurks and awkwardly shuffles across the stage as the murdering Hyde, while embodying the perfect gentleman when playing Jekyll. It becomes hard not to root for the antagonist when it’s so fun to watch his every move on stage.Jekyll and Hyde are played to perfection by Nathaniel Hackmann. As soon as you hear him sing a soft and sad goodbye to his dying father in the first scene, you can’t help but be excited to hear him sing an evil tune, as his voice seems to have no limits. Hackmann makes you feel safe and happy as he sings “Take Me As I Am,” with his betrothed, Emma Carew, played by Liana Hunt, and then just a few songs later sinister seems much more fun as Hackmann belts his way through “Alive” and becomes Hyde.

Of course, Hackmann is not the only star of the show. Caitlyn Caughell plays a seductive yet vulnerable Lucy Harris, a lady of the night who entices both Jekyll and Hyde. Harris’ formidable voice is the perfect partner to Hackmann’s, and the moments featuring the couple are among the most enchanting, including the tragic love song “Dangerous Game.” It’s also not hard to understand why both the successful doctor and the mysterious Hyde enchant the young wench when Hackmann plays both — can you blame her?

The set, designed by Stephen Dobay, helps make Hyde even more menacing, with several long screens that cast Hyde as a prowling red shadow on the hunt. Each screen also has two empty frames hanging from the top, subtly reminding the audience of Jekyll’s original inspiration of each person having two sides in them: good and evil. And, of course, the orchestra, under the direction of Kristen Lee Rosenfeld, brings the pop rock hits of the original score to life and makes the evil tunes of the show all the more fun.Tom Lucca, who plays John Utterson, Jekyll’s loyal friend and lawyer, is also worth mentioning. Scenes where the two share the stage are very entertaining. The ensemble cast also has some stand-out moments, and it starts at the beginning with the hospital board all denying Jekyll. Each board member is worth focusing on for a minute, especially Joey Calveri as Lord Savage, whose facial expressions in every scene bring added fun to the stage. Ensemble songs like “Façade” and “Girls of the Night” highlight the singing strength of the cast.

 

Read online at: http://tbrnewsmedia.com/jekyll-hyde-mesmerizes-at-the-engeman/

DC Metro Theater Arts Review: ‘Jekyll & Hyde the Musical’ at the John W. Engeman Theater

DC Metro Theater Arts

March 21, 2017

Kristen Weyer

 

The John W. Engeman Theater at Northport’s current production of Jekyll & Hyde the Musical is a nostalgic nod to its first season. Based on the classic novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, with book and lyrics by Leslie Bricuse and music by Frank Wildhorn, Jekyll & Hyde is directed and choreographed by Paul Stancato. One of the theater’s most requested productions, Jekyll & Hyde is sure to thrill audiences straight from the opening scene.

Dr. Henry Jekyll is a man with a mission. He is determined to prove that the evil side of man’s nature can be removed and separated from the good. All he needs is a test subject for his serum, but the Board of Governors at the mental hospital refuse to give him one. Convinced he is in the right, and desperate to prove himself, Henry concludes his only choice is to experiment upon himself. The unexpected and dire consequences of this action put him at risk of losing everything he holds dear: his friendships, his fiancée Emma, even his own sanity. A riveting show, Jekyll & Hyde, is a melancholy and disturbing tale of good intentions gone awry.

This production is fabulous. Gorgeous and exquisite costumes by Kurt Alger swirl through the evocative choreography of Paul Stancato. Tantalizing effects of light and shadow play with emotion and heighten drama through the brilliance of Keith A. Truax. The ingenious set of sliding picture frames by Stephen Dobay works very well in varying aspects, and is especially apropos for the number “Façade” which underlays the entire show. The music which at times is soaring and stunning, and at others dissonant and spine-chilling, is superbly executed by Music Director Kristen Lee Rosenfeld and the entire band; with excellent sound design by Laura Shubert bolstering the production as a whole.

The cast of this show is perfection. Nathaniel Hackmann gives an incredible performance as Henry Jekyll/Mr. Hyde. With clearly defined characteristics, mannerisms and tone, the seeming ease with which he portrays the duality of his character is stunning. His strong and clear voice rings with emotion and soars through the theater with every number, particularly in the iconic “This Is the Moment, and Hyde’s “Alive!”.

The two women in Jekyll’s life are his fiancée Emma, played by Liana Hunt, and girl-of-the-night Lucy, performed by Caitlyn Caughell. Hunt’s sweet and loyal Emma is convincing and charming, and with a lovely voice to match, a pleasure to listen to. Emma and Lucy’s duet of “In His Eyes” is a wonderful match-up of harmonization. Caughell plays the jaded Lucy faultlessly, with just the right amount of wariness and burgeoning hope. Her show stopping vocals are on outstanding display in “Someone Like You” and “A New Life”.

Both Tom Lucca, as Jekyll’s friend John, and Jeff Williams, as Emma’s father Sir Danvers did wonderfully. Their believable emotions are genuine assets to their characters. The entire ensemble deserves commendation on their skills. The singing, dancing and characterization are spot-on and strengthen the entire performance.

The heartrending, and chilling tale of one man’s fatal choices, Jekyll & Hyde is a hauntingly beautiful musical. The Engeman’s production should not be missed.

Running Time: 2 hours and 30 minutes, with one 15-minute intermission.

 

Read online: http://dcmetrotheaterarts.com/review-jekyll-hyde-musical-john-w-engeman-theater/

The John W. Engeman Theater presents JEKYLL & HYDE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

(Northport, NY- March 2017) – The John W. Engeman Theater announces the cast and creative team for JEKYLL & HYDE. Performances begin on Thursday, March 16 at 8:00pm and run through Sunday, April 30, 2017.

Based on the classic story by Robert Louis Stevenson and featuring a thrilling score of pop rock hits from multi Grammy and Tony® nominated Frank Wildhorn and double Oscar and Grammy winning Leslie Bricusse, JEKYLL & HYDE has mesmerized audiences the world over. An evocative tale of two men, one a doctor, passionate and romantic, and the other, a terrifying madman, and two women, one beautiful and trusting and the other, beautiful and trusting only herself. Both unaware of his dark secret. Their story unfolds in this gripping musical thriller resplendent with a sumptuous score including the unforgettable, “This is the Moment,” “Someone Like You” and “A New Life.”

JEKYLL & HYDE is produced by RICHARD T. DOLCE the Engeman Theater’s Producing Artistic Director.

The Director and Choreographer is PAUL STANCATO (Engeman Theater: Sound of Music, Hairspray; Broadway: The Wedding Singer (Asst. Choreo.), The Lion King (Res. Director); National Tours: Flashdance (Dir/Choreo), Jekyll & Hyde (Dir/Choreo), The Wedding Singer (Dir); International: House of Dancing Water (Artistic Director), New York; Regional: NYMF, Beckett Theater, Minetta Lane, Flatrock Playhouse, Palm Beach Dramaworks and the Zipper Theater). The Musical Director is KRISTEN LEE ROSENFELD (National Tour: Spring Awakening; NYC: Band of Angels, Divided – Composer). The Associate Director is DANA IANNUZZI (National/International Tour: Flashdance; NYC: ICON, The Cobalteans, Divided).

 

The Creative Team includes: STEPHEN DOBAY (Scenic Design), KURT ALGER (Costume/Wig Design), KEITH A. TRUAX (Lighting Design), LAURA SHUBERT (Sound Design), GAYLE SEAY, SCOTT WOJCIK and HOLLY BUCZEK of WOJCIK/SEAY CASTING (Casting Directors), SEAN FRANCIS PATRICK (Production Stage Manager) and LEILA SCANDAR (Assistant Stage Manager).

 

The cast of JEKYLL & HYDE features CAITLYN CAUGHELL as Lucy Harris (Broadway: Newsies (u/s Katherine & Medda Larkin); National Tour: Bridges of Madison County (u/s Marian & Carolyn); Regional: The Kennedy Center, Sacramento Music Circus, The Hangar Theater, Tri Arts Sharon Theater and Light Opera Oklahoma), NATHANIEL HACKMANN as Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde (Broadway/National Tours: Les Miserables (Valjean, Javert u/s), Paint Your Wagon (Steve); Regional: Beauty and the Beast at MUNY (Gaston), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Oliver!, Sweeney ToddA Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the ForumCarousel, Ragtime, Into the Woods, Camelot, Sanders Family Christmas, Bye Bye Birdie) and LIANA HUNT as Emma Carew (Broadway: Newsies (Katherine), Mamma Mia! (Sophie); National Tours: Wicked (Nessarose), Mamma Mia! (Sophie); Regional: Private Lives at Riverside Theatre, Les Miserables at Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, Beauty and the Beast at Jean’s Playhouse).

The cast also includes: DANNY ARNOLD, RYAN BLOOMQUIST, JOEY CALVERI, LILY DICKINSON, LAUREN GOBES, LAURA HELM, DEVEN KOLLURI, MEGAN KOUMIS, REBECCA KUZNICK, TOM LUCCA, JAKE MILLS, WILLIAM MULLIGAN, BRONSON NORRIS MURPHY, BLAKE PRICE, JAMES D. SCHULTZ, TERESA WHITT and JEFF WILLIAMS.

Press Opening is Saturday, March 18th at 8:00pm

 

JEKYLL & HYDE will play the following performance schedule: Thursdays at 8:00pm, Fridays at 8:00pm, Saturdays at 3:00pm and 8:00pm, and Sundays at 2:00. Some Wednesday and Sunday evenings are available. Tickets are $76 on Saturday evenings, $71 all other performances and may be purchased by calling (631) 261-2900, going online at www.EngemanTheater.com, or by visiting the Engeman Theater Box Office at 250 Main Street, Northport. Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express accepted.

 

The John W. Engeman Theater at Northport is Long Island’s only year round professional theater company, casting actors from the Broadway talent pool. From curb to curtain, we have made it our business to provide affordable, quality, theater in an elegant one-of-a-kind location with outstanding facilities and extraordinary service. The renovated Theater offers stadium-style seating, state-of-the-art lighting and sound, a full orchestra pit, and a classic wood-paneled piano lounge with full bar.

 

For a complete show schedule and more information contact the theater directly at 631-261-2900, visit the box office at 250 Main Street, Northport or visit www.EngemanTheater.com

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